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Systematic Design

Systematic Design

Christopher Christopher Hernandez earned this badge on Apr 16, 2020

SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO DESIGN

Challenges

  • Identify and sequence instructional goals

    Submit evidence of ordering instructional goals (not course objectives) for a target audience (what an instructor will teach). 

    • Examples: Learning Design Activity #4 (EDCI 575), eLearning Project Proposal (EDCI 569), Design Documents (EDCI 588), Deliverables from Practicum (EDCI 573), Individual Game Document (EDCI 556), course or training design or re-design documents/proposals, artifacts (design, performance, workplace, educational, other) demonstrating the arrangement of instructional goals/objectives.

    For the competency “Identify and Sequence Instructional Goals,” I have chosen to submit an episode from my personal podcast entitled “DIR Floortime” which explains the sequence of instructional goals within the DIR Floortime teaching model.

    DIR Floortime stands for Developmental, Individual-Differences, Relationship based teaching model. This teaching methodology faces several different hardships within the realm of education. First and foremost, at about twelve years old (used in practice) this teaching method is still fairly new. As a constructivist based teaching model, DIR Floortime can also be difficult to explain. This is because the field of special education is populated by behavioral therapy, especially in private schools. So, in order to properly explain goals and objectives found within the DIR Floortime curriculum, we must discuss each goal/objective that is designed into this methodologies instruction. Within my personal Podcast I do exactly that. I dive into the structure of the DIR Floortime method and demonstrate how instructional goals/objectives are designed into curriculum.

    As explained in my podcast episode, DIR Floortime works off of a developmental ladder involving play based teaching scenarios. The developmental ladder includes shared attention/regulation, engagement, two way communication, etc. With this identified, I then sequence the goals of each developmental level. Shared attention is getting the student to focus on the educator. Engagement is having the learner focused on an activity at hand. I continue to identify all the instructional goals for each developmental capacity that is focused on within the DIR Floortime model. I use several different scenarios, such as a child staring back or pointing at their caregiver. This explanation provides a fundamental understanding of identifying DIR Floortime and sequencing its goals.

    I have been working within the DIR Floortime model for a little under three years. I have found it to be both an interesting and effective model for students with developmental delays. One of the hardest parts of working under this model has been explaining its goals and the process in which the methodology functions. I feel like I have gained an understanding of the model, thanks to my graduate studies, and am better able to identify goals. One area of growth could be found in creating a graphic that better shows the model for what it is. A graphic would also provide those with a visual aid to reference while listening to the podcast. I plan to continue growing and using the skills I obtain within this program to develop better instructional materials for this methodology.

    The challenge was to demonstrate an arrangement of instructional design goals and objectives. I provide this demonstration by explaining the goals and objectives found within the Floortime model. Having provided this, I am also providing instructors with an understanding of their role as a teacher within the model. What could have made this artifact much stronger was if it were presented as a video instruction rather than an audio instruction. However, video instruction would be challenging as it would require clearance from the parents of students and a large percent of parents do not want their student to be seen online.
  • Specify and sequence the anticipated learning and performance outcomes

    Submit evidence of specify and sequence the anticipated learning and performance outcomes (statements that describe the knowledge or skills students should acquire by the end of a module).

    • Examples: Learning Design Activity #4 (EDCI 575), eLearning Project Proposal (EDCI 569), Design Documents (EDCI 588), Deliverables from Practicum (EDCI 573), Individual Game Document (EDCI 556), course or training design or re-design documents/proposals, artifacts (design, performance, workplace, educational, other) demonstrating the arrangement of instructional goals/objectives.

    For the challenge “Specify and sequence the anticipated learning and performance outcomes,” I have chosen to submit my EDCI 569 eLearning project proposal.

                The challenge asks for proof of statements that demonstrate the knowledge and skills that students should acquire by the end of the course. Within my EDCI 569 Project proposal there is a section labeled “intended instruction.” Intended instruction describes what learners should learn by the end of the course and how this intended instruction will be carried out. Parents of the Rebecca School will be using the course with the intention of learning the fundamentals of DIRFloortime. This includes understanding what developmental capacities are and how to recognize what capacity their child is currently at. Learners should also learn how to use DIRFloortime techniques to help their child move up the developmental ladder.

                This artifact is actually the revised version of my project proposal. Although I am proud of this proposal, I often have problems writing intended goals and objectives for learners. I definitely can see that I have improved over the past year, but I still seem to leave out a few details when it comes to learning goals and how to obtain those goals.

                Much like my previous systematic design challenge, I feel like the only way to improve on describing what knowledge and skills are intended at the end of learning would be to continue writing practice proposals.

    Hernandez_C_Paper_Design_Phase_Part1_569Sec002(1).docx Hernandez_C_Paper_Design_Phase_Part1_569Sec002(1).docx